Why Are Coral Reefs Important?

It's not news that the world currently faces a climate crisis. We watch the news, see our feeds and read the papers, and it is evident that the impact of human consumption has drastically increased rates of global warming, increased pollution in our oceans, destroyed large areas of rainforest and damaged vital eco-systems across the globe.

Coral reefs are so important for our planet and yet they are hugely under-represented in the overall climate change movement. We started TYDL to both raise awareness of the importance of the reef, but also actually help our oceans as well. We want TYDL to represent a cause, not just another logo on a sportswear brand.

All is not lost though. Mother nature is a cunning force to be reckoned with. She can reclaim land in days, re-grow vast areas of green lands again and even regulate our global temperatures, but we do need to give her a break!

Did you know:

  • Even though coral reefs cover less than 1% of the oceans floor, they generate over half of Earth’s oxygen. This is largely due to Phytoplankton that live among the reefs, which are home to 25% of all sea life
  • The ocean absorbs almost a third of global Co2 emissions - resulting in altered PH levels that greatly affect the reefs.
  • Known as the rainforests of the oceans, coral reefs are home to over 4,000 species of fish and house over 25% of all marine life.
  • Despite being around for over 20,000 years, half of The Great Barrier reef has disappeared in just 27 years according to a 2012 study.
  • They have other benefits for humans such as medicinal research, tourism, and protection for our shorelines from adverse weather.

There is an old saying "Out of sight, out of mind, out of action". It means that when things are not spoken about, seen or heard, action is rarely, if ever taken, which is why we are making it our mission to do what we can to help save our reefs.


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